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Thursday, September 24, 2020

The Basics of a “Killer” Quiz Marketing Strategy?

  1. The Hero’s Journey
  2. Deploying Psychological Tactics
  3. Micro commitments
  4. Risk aversion
  5. Request a demo of our premier Marketing tool for Retirement Specialists

When setting out to craft a marketing quiz it is important to remember that you are creating primarily a marketing tool. That does not mean that the quiz taker does not receive any value. They do. But the value is your offer. The genius of quiz marketing is disguising its marketing intentions by providing value to the individual taking the quiz. 

 

The Hero’s Journey

 

Questions in a quiz should be organized like a story plot. It is best to start with a simple binary – yes or no – question and slowly build to your final value proposition. The main idea is to present your offer after the quiz taker begins to see some flaws in their reasoning and holes in their current problem-solving strategy. Ideally to the point that they accept your offer as a reasonable solution. 

 

The killer quiz capitalizes on a set of mistakes that people either don’t realize or have a suspicion they are making. It deploys the same methodology as other quiz marketing types: 

  • Attract a quiz taker with a topical headline; 
  • Diagnose their problem through probing questions
  • Prescribe your solution to their problem with a value proposition. 

 

Deploying Psychological Tactics

 

I wrote before about how quiz marketing delivers high-quality leads, but I did not mention their psychological power. A killer quiz combines two psychological tactics to convert the most highly motivated leads into your marketing quiz. 

 

Micro commitments

 

I alluded to micro-commitments above when writing how the first question should have a simple binary answer and, in general, your quiz answers should not be difficult. 

 

The early questions, especially the first one, should not be too difficult because people are most likely to stop a quiz at the beginning. But, if the quiz taker proceeds at slow, rewarding progress, then they attach some level of commitment to their final result. I.e, your solution to their problem.  

 

Risk aversion

 

Imagine that you are sitting down to a delicious dinner when you hear an insistent knock on the door in the middle of the night. Alarmed, but curious, you venture to your front door and find your neighbor. “A local financial advisor is providing free portfolio consultations for the next 24 hours.” 

 

It is an interesting offer, sure, but neither the time is appropriate nor does the offer present itself in any urgent way. 

 

Now, instead, imagine that your neighbor interrupts your evening dinner but with a different message. “You are being robbed as we speak!”

 

That message seizes your attention because of one critical psychological trick every financial advisor should be aware of: risk aversion. 

 

The headline and diagnosis questions in a Killer Quiz intend to incite urgency and demand. It sorts people into buckets based on a common mistake or obstacle blocking them from having the outcome they want.

 

A Killer Quiz Headline may ask: 

 

“What’s your #1 Piano Playing Progress Killer?” or “What is your primary obstacle keeping you from your wealth goals?”

 

It may use words that inspire fear of loss. “Pitfall, limitation, stumbling block, hurdle, blindspot”, for example. 

 

Request a demo of our premier Marketing tool for Retirement Specialists

 

RiXtrema’s blog is always trying to keep Financial Advisors aware of the most modern marketing method. You can follow along with regular updates through our newsletter by signing up at the bottom of the page. 

 

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